"MILLWRIGHTS THE TRADE OF ALL TRADES"



I.W.--- MILLWRIGHT RIGGING





1971 RIGGING AGREEMENT




MILLWRIGHT-IRON WORKER - RIGGING OF MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT AGREEMENT BETWEEN UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS & JOINERS OF AMERICA AND THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BRIDGE, STRUCTURAL AND ORNAMENTAL IRON WORKERS Dated May 1, 1971

AGREEMENT This Agreement shall become effective May 1, 1971, and is in accord with the action of the National Joint Board for the Settlement of Jurisdictional Disputes at its meeting of July 8-9, 1970, in having invoked Article 3, Section 5 of the Plan for the Settling of Jurisdictional Disputes Nationally and Locally. Contractors, in accordance with the procedural rules of the National Joint Board for the Settlement of Jurisdictional Disputes, shall make all assignments between Millwrights and Iron Workers over rigging in connection with the installation of machinery and/or equipment on building and construction projects in accordance with the provisions as set forth in this Agreement.

Further, on all work currently in progress on the effective date of this Agreement, application of its provisions shall be extended to enable an orderly implementation by responsible contractors to conform to its provisions, not exceeding thirty (30) days, or June 1, 1971.

The purpose and intent of this Agreement is to improve relations between the two crafts, eliminate jurisdictional disputes which may arise and to mutually assist each other in the securing of work coming within their recognized jurisdiction, which shall contribute to the development of procedures in the best interest of the Industry.

ARTICLE #I PACKAGE MACHINERY and/or PACKAGE EQUIPMENT

(a) The unloading of package machinery and/or package equipment and the transporting of same by any means from the point of unloading or from a storage area to the point of final installation, or to a temporary holding point in the area of final installation, as designated by the responsible contractor, shall be the work of the Iron Workers. The temporary holding point, as distinguished from a storage area, shall be as near to the foundation as job conditions or required working space will permit, with the responsible contractor to be the final judge.

(b) After the package machinery or package equipment has been brought from the point of unloading or from the storage area to the point of final installation or to a temporary holding point as outlined in Paragraph (a) above, all further moving and handling by any means required to complete the installation shall be the work of the Millwrights.

ARTICLE #2 Knock Down or Dismantled Machinery and/or Equipment Found in Light Industrial Plants

(a) The unloading of components of knocked down or dismantled machinery and/or equipment and the transporting of same by any means from the point of unloading or from storage areas to an assembly area designated by the responsible contractor, or if direct installation can be made, to the point of final installation, shall be the work of the Iron Workers.

No arbitrary limitation shall be placed on the assembly area, but it shall be as reasonably close to the foundation on which the installation is being made as job conditions or required working space will, in the judgment of the responsible contractor, permit.

(b) After the components have been brought to the designated assembly area, or to the point of installation as outlined in Paragraph (a) of this section, all further rigging by any means required during the cleaning, turning, fitting and assembling of the components, and to make the final installation, shall be the work of the Millwrights.

ARTICLE #3 Machinery and/or Equipment Found in Heavy Industrial Plants

(a) The unloading and transporting of machinery and/or equipment to a temporary holding point in the area of installation or any cleaning and sub-assembly area as designated by the responsible contractor shall be the work of the Iron Workers.

(b) The rigging work required in the cleaning and sub-assembly area shall be performed by the Millwrights.

(c) The handling of machinery and/or equipment from the temporary holding point in the area of installation or the cleaning and sub-assembly area to the final point of installation will be performed by an equal numbered composite crew of Iron Workers and Millwrights.

(d) After composite rigging crew has safely placed machinery and/or equipment, Millwrights will complete installation, i.e., final alignment.

(e) Rigging of dismantled or knocked down machinery and/or equipment found in heavy industrial plants from one sub-assembly area to another sub-assembly area, prior to final installation, shall be the work of the Iron Workers.

ARTICLE #4 Removal of Machinery and/or Equipment

(a) Removing and loading out of machinery and/or equipment which does not require any disassembly shall be the work of the Iron Workers.

(b) The disassembly of machinery and/or equipment shall be performed in inverse order as outlined in sections 2 and 3 above.

ARTICLE #5 Foremen

The responsible contractor shall have the prerogative of selecting the first foreman from either craft. The second foreman selected shall be a member of the alternate craft. All foremen shall be "working foremen" and shall be counted as members of the composite rigging crew.

ARTICLE #6 Local Union and Contractor Responsibilities

There shall be no work stoppage, slow down, sit down or picket lines established by members of either craft.

Should a dispute arise over interpretation of any part of this agreement, work shall continue as assigned by the responsible contractor.

Local representatives of each craft shall then meet on the job site and attempt to settle the dispute. If agreement cannot be arrived at by the Local representatives, they shall then submit prints, pictures and all other pertinent information to the two administrators of this agreement for their consideration.

ARTICLE #7 Interpretation of Light and Heavy Industrial Plants

The various types of plants listed below are to be used as a guide in distinguishing between light and heavy industrial plants:

Light Industrial Plants:

Chemical, sewage, furniture, clothing, shoe, appliance, radio, television, soft drink and candy manufacturing plants as well as flour mills, textile mills, bakeries, breweries, canneries, laundries and dairies.

Heavy Industrial Plants:

Power plants, steel and/or basic metal producing facilities, paper mills, foundries, ore reduction, pelletizing, automotive, farm implements, news print and stamping plants.

ARTICLE #8

Scope of Agreement

(a) This agreement does not affect or supersede the Conveyor Agreement of June 22, 1953 and June 5, 1957, or the General Agreement of October 1, 1968, nor shall it supersede any agreements now existing which the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America or the International Association of Bridge, Structural and Ornamental Iron Workers may have with other International Unions.

(b) This agreement shall apply to all subordinate bodies of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America and the International Association of Bridge, Structural and Ornamental Iron Workers.

________________________________ _______________________________

John H. Lyons, General President M.A. Hutcheson, Gen. President Internatl Association of Bridge, United Brotherhood of Carpenters Structural and Ornamental Iron and Joiners of America Workers February 11, 1971 (execution date). ATTESTED APRIL 20, 1971 Wm. J. Cour, Chairman National Joint Board for Settlement of Jurisdictional Disputes

ARTICLE #7 Light and Heavy Industrial Plants: Light Industrial Plants: Oil refineries and plastic have been added. Heavy Industrial Plants: Locks and dams have been added.

Following are minutes of various meetings conducted by the Jurisdictional Department of the General Office regarding the interpretation of the May 1, 1971 Agreement on Rigging Machinery and Equipment.

You will note in the first minutes, Page 38, Paragraph 6, it was expressed that the May 1, 1971 Agreement did not cover maintenance work; however, in later meetings you should read Page 51, Paragraph 4 as well as Page 54, Paragraph 1, with particular attention to Page 55, Paragraph 2. This should clear up the interpretation pertaining to maintenance work.

ARTICLE #3, MACHINERY AND/OR EQUIPMENT FOUND IN HEAVY INDUSTRIAL PLANTS (May l, 1971 Agreement)

a. The unloading and transporting of machinery and/or equipment to a temporary holding point in the area of installation or any cleaning and sub-assembly area as designated by the responsible contractor shall be the work of the Iron Workers.

b. The rigging work required in the cleaning and sub-assembly area shall be performed by the Millwrights.

c. The handling of machinery and/or equipment from the temporary holding point in the area of installation or the cleaning and sub-assembly area to the final point of installation will be performed by an equal number composite crew of Iron Workers and Millwrights.

d. After composite rigging crew has safely placed machinery and/or equipment, Millwrights will complete installation, i.e., final alignment.

INTERPRETATION - Article #3

On Page 23, last paragraph, of the enclosed meetings, the contractor had designated the turbine floor as the cleaning and assembly area, which was concurred in by those in attendance. Your Jurisdictional Department at the General Office finds that this is the way that most contractors assign the work pertaining to power houses. In other heavy industrial plants the contractor normally designates the floor area as the cleaning and sub-assembly area.

ARTICLE #7, INTERPRETATION OF LIGHT AND HEAVY INDUSTRIAL PLANTS (May 1, 1971 Agreement)

The various types of plants listed below are to be used as a guide in distinguishing between light and heavy industrial plants:

Light Industrial Plants:

Chemical, sewage, furniture, clothing, shoe, appliance, radio, television, soft drink and candy manufacturing plants as well as flour mills, textile mills, bakeries, breweries, canneries, laundries, and dairies.

Heavy Industrial Plants:

Power Plants, steel and/or basic metal producing facilities, paper mills, foundries, ore reduction, pelletizing, automotive, farm implement, news print and stamping plants.

INTERPRETATION - Sewage

On Page 36 you will note reference is made to sewage treatment plants in Paragraph 3 and in Article #7 of the May 1, 1971 Agreement. There has been continued discussions between the International Committees concerning what should be classified as machinery and equipment as specified in Article #7 of the May 1, 1971 Agreement, and no clear understanding could be reached. Since no clear understanding could be reached on sewage, the October 1, 1968 Agreement was amended to provide for a method of settling those disputes on sewage and water treatment plants that may arise on items specified in the agreement of October 1, 1968 as listed below.

ARTICLE #18, SEWAGE AND WATER TREATMENT PLANTS

Section 1. It is agreed that all unloading, rigging and installation of the equipment, including the aligning and leveling, within the bowl, tank, basin, in round or rectangle tanks, in sewage treatment and water treatment plants shall be performed by a composite crew of equal numbers of Iron Workers and Millwrights. The equipment shall include the center bearing, center column, sweep arms, squeegees, walk-ways, machinery platforms, machinery, wiers, ice guards, telescope arms, tracks, cat-walks, handrails on bridge and top of bowl, tanks, bridges or cat-walks and handrails in between one bowl, tanks, basin to another. The first foreman shall be selected by the Company, and the second shall be from the alternate trade.

Section 2. Rectangle tanks having skimmers or flight conveyors and etc., shall be installed in accordance with the Conveyor Agreement.

ARTICLE #7, INTERPRETATION OF LIGHT AND HEAVY INDUSTRIAL PLANTS (May 1, 1971 Agreement)

The various types of plants listed below are to be used as a guide in distinguishing between light and heavy industrial plants:

Light Industrial Plants:

Chemical, sewage, furniture, clothing, shoe, appliance, radio, television, soft drink and candy manufacturing plants as well as flour mills, textile mills, bakeries, breweries, canneries, laundries and dairies.

Heavy Industrial Plants:

Power plants, steel and/or basic metal producing facilities, paper mills, foundries, ore reduction pelletizing, automotive, farm implement, news print and stamping plants.

INTERPRETATION (Heavy Industrial Plants) - Pelletizing

Power plants, steel and/or basic metal producing facilities, paper mills, foundries, ore reduction, pelletizing, automotive, farm implement, news print and stamping plants.

There are many chemical and plastic plants and etc., under light industrial plants, that has the final product pelletized; however, this does not alter the fact that this type of plant would still fall under the Light Industrial Plants as specified in Article #7.

Bascule Bridges Aligning, leveling and securing on Bascule Bridge. The Rigging Agreement of May 1, 1971 should be used on this type of job.

ARTICLE #4, REMOVAL OF MACHINERY AND/OR EQUIPMENT

a. Removing and loading out of machinery and/or equipment which does not require any disassembly shall be the work of the Iron Workers.

b. The disassembly of machinery and/or equipment shall be performed in inverse order as outlined in Sections 2 and 3 above.

INTERPRETATION

Article #4, Removal of Machinery and/or Equipment. This section is applicable to a situation where machinery is being removed from existing plant and moved to another location.

In the process of an installation of machinery and equipment should it be necessary to remove a piece of machinery or equipment to return to the factory, this is covered on Page 25, Paragraph 3, and last paragraph on Page 31.

ARTICLE #1, PACKAGE MACHINERY AND/OR PACKAGE EQUIPMENT

a. The unloading of package machinery and/or package equipment and the transporting of same by any means from the point of unloading or from a storage area to the point of final installation, or to a temporary holding point in the area of final installation, as designated by the responsible contractor, shall be the work of the Iron Workers. The temporary holding point, as distinguished from a storage area, shall be as near to the foundation as job conditions or required working space will permit, with the responsible contractor to be the final judge.

b. After the package machinery or package equipment has been brought from the point of unloading or from the storage area to the point of final installation or to a temporary holding point as outlined in Paragraph (a) above, all further moving and handling by any means required to complete the installation shall be the work of the Millwrights.

ARTICLE #2, KNOCK DOWN OR DISMANTLED MACHINERY AND/OR EQUIPMENT FOUND IN LIGHT INDUSTRIAL PLANTS

a. The unloading of components of knocked down or dismantled machinery and/or equipment and the transporting of same by any means from the point of unloading or from storage areas to an assembly area designated by the responsible contractor, or if direct installation can be made, to the point of final installation, shall be the work of the Iron Workers.

No arbitrary limitation shall be placed on the assembly area, but it shall be as reasonably close to the foundation on which the installation is being made as job conditions or required working space will, in the judgment of the responsible contractor, permit.

b. After the components have been brought to the designated assembly area, or to the point of installation as required in Paragraph (a) of this section, all further rigging by any means required during the cleaning, turning, fitting and assembling of the components, and to make the final installation, shall be the work of the Millwrights.

INTERPRETATION

Package Machinery and/or Package Equipment and Knock Down or Dismantled Machinery and/or Equipment found in Light Industrial Plants Package machinery, Page 36, Paragraph 2, of the enclosed minutes, "Package machinery falls within the Light Industry Classification", and therefore should be rigged and installed in the same manner as knocked down or disassembled machinery and/or equipment as specified under Article #2, above.





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